“What’s Wrong with You?”: It’s Okay to Seek Counseling

Before the year ends and you’re about to scribble that “New Years Resolutions” down –I want to encourage you to seek counseling.

I was texting a friend who asked me my plans for the day. I replied, “Work, study, and then I have a therapy session later on.” They replied, “What’s wrong with you?”. On that day nothing in particular was “wrong”, but I realized there are many misconceptions of what counseling is for.

First of all, counseling isn’t just about something being wrong with you.

In the beginning, I seeked counseling because I had anxiety about my future, I struggled with my self-esteem, and I was having a very hard time letting go of a relationship. The first day of counseling was just a simple assessment of myself and what I wanted to get out of it. After that,  it was simply just talking to someone about how I was feeling or what I’ve been thinking. After going to counseling for 3 months, I’ve never felt better and most of all I feel more in control. Some days at counseling were better than others, but I always left the session with a new personal goal for the next session.

Counseling provides a professional person who is trained to be beside you, listen to you, support you, and also to challenge you when pivotal moments arise. They will not give you advice on what to do in obstacles you face, but they will help guide you in areas you want to improve in your life. Though the obstacles I face are still not completely resolved, I’ve made several strides within myself since going to counseling.

I’ve encouraged many of my friends to seek counseling and though it was like pulling teeth at first –they finally went. I’ve heard great stories on how much it helped them with many abstract feelings and how to deal with them concretely.

Here are some other reasons people seek counseling:

Life transitions

Grief & Loss

Work-Life balance/stress reduction

Peer relationship struggles

Developmental struggles

Behavioral struggles

LGBTQ issues

Coping skills

Anxiety

Depression

ADD/ADHD

Coping skills

Anger management

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